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Police Reform

Exclusive: Representative Kim Schrier on police reform [Video]

Congresswoman Kim Schrier taking notes in King County to help with two amendment proposals on policing.Subscribe to Q13 FOX: https://www.youtube.com/c/q13foxnews?sub_confirmation=1Watch Q13 FOX Live: https://www.q13fox.com/liveQ13 FOX is Seattle and Western Washington’s source for breaking news, weather, traffic and sports. Home of Washington’s Most Wanted with David Rose and The Divide with Brandi Kruse. Q13 FOX is the official TV partner of the Seattle Seahawks, Seattle Sounders FC and Seattle Storm Basketball.Download the Q13 News App: https://q13fox.onelink.me/PeGO/7e4d2af8Download the Q13 News: Seattle Weather App: https://jckig.app.link/dlUcXuM2PebFollow Q13 FOX on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Q13FOXFollow Q13 FOX on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Q13FOXFollow Q13 FOX on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/q13foxSubscribe to the Q13 FOX newsletter: https://www.q13fox.com/newsletters

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Police Reform

The Nigerian Police And Allegations Of Corruption | THE BREAKFAST [Video]

Bosinde Araikpe, Police Reform Advocate joined us to discuss. ————————————————————————-Watch More: https://bit.ly/2KLQxbIWatch PlusTV Africa Lifestyle: https://cutt.ly/tbdOHzQWatch via our Website: https://plustvafrica.com/live-tvLike us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PlusTVAfrika/Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/plustvafrica/ Tweet us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlusTVAfricaComment on Whatsapp: http://ow.ly/d4kQ50pT4Bt#PlusTVAfrica #TheBreakfast

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Police Reform

Biden wants more transparency for police disciplinary records Experts [Video]

During a CNN town hall in Cincinnati, Ohio, this month, President Joe Biden called for use of a tool long touted by police reform advocates: access to police disciplinary records.“We have to have rules where you can be able to determine what the background (is), how many times a cop has violated the rules, and be able to have access to what’s going on in police departments so the Justice Department can get involved in whether or not they have to change their pattern and practices,” Biden said. The fight for access to police personnel records has picked up urgency recently, as calls for police accountability have renewed in the wake of George Floyd’s death last year, as well as other high-profile killings of Black Americans by police. Derek Chauvin, the police officer convicted of murdering Floyd, had 18 complaints filed against him during his 19 years with Minneapolis police. Chauvin used force or was involved in an incident in which force was used during eight instances. And Chauvin is just one example in a larger trend in which officers can keep working despite continued misconduct. According to an investigation from USA TODAY in 2019, more than 85,000 police officers have been investigated or disciplined for misconduct in the past decade and 30,000 officers were decertified by state oversight agencies. The George Floyd Justice Policing Act of 2021, introduced originally in 2020, would create a federal registry of police misconduct complaints and disciplinary actions. The bill passed through the House on mostly party lines in early March but has met gridlock in Senate. But the move to make the records public is more difficult than it seems, experts say. Here’s why. America has long emphasized the importance of state and local autonomy, and police forces are no different. There are around 18,000 police departments across the United States, including about 15,400 local police departments, according to the Department of Justice. Each has its own rules, responsibilities, and powers, including the processes by which they discipline their officers and record data on their employees. Most don’t collect the same kinds of information, making the process of crunching police conduct data into one uniform database difficult and time-consuming, says Maira Kwaja, director of public strategy at the Invisible Institute.“What we’ve learned in just doing this in Chicago, that the way that the city government maintains and creates data changes from almost year to year. Every few years they move to a different database…. Even being sure that an officer is the same person from year to year is very tough,” said Kwaja. If an officer moves departments, tracking their conduct can become nearly impossible.“There’s no unique identifier for each individual officer in the country, so if an officer gets fired or resigns, they can easily move to another jurisdiction and start working, and there’s no real way to track that throughout the country,” said Kwaja.All data is taken from the source: http://usatoday.comArticle Link: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2021/07/31/biden-wants-openness-police-disciplinary-files-thats-hard-do/5422091001/#police #newsamerican#newstodayupdate #newstodaydonaldtrump #newstodayheadlines #newsworldbbc #

Categories
Police Reform

Biden wants more transparency for police disciplinary records Experts [Video]

During a CNN town hall in Cincinnati, Ohio, this month, President Joe Biden called for use of a tool long touted by police reform advocates: access to police disciplinary records.“We have to have rules where you can be able to determine what the background (is), how many times a cop has violated the rules, and be able to have access to what’s going on in police departments so the Justice Department can get involved in whether or not they have to change their pattern and practices,” Biden said. The fight for access to police personnel records has picked up urgency recently, as calls for police accountability have renewed in the wake of George Floyd’s death last year, as well as other high-profile killings of Black Americans by police. Derek Chauvin, the police officer convicted of murdering Floyd, had 18 complaints filed against him during his 19 years with Minneapolis police. Chauvin used force or was involved in an incident in which force was used during eight instances. And Chauvin is just one example in a larger trend in which officers can keep working despite continued misconduct. According to an investigation from USA TODAY in 2019, more than 85,000 police officers have been investigated or disciplined for misconduct in the past decade and 30,000 officers were decertified by state oversight agencies. The George Floyd Justice Policing Act of 2021, introduced originally in 2020, would create a federal registry of police misconduct complaints and disciplinary actions. The bill passed through the House on mostly party lines in early March but has met gridlock in Senate. But the move to make the records public is more difficult than it seems, experts say. Here’s why. America has long emphasized the importance of state and local autonomy, and police forces are no different. There are around 18,000 police departments across the United States, including about 15,400 local police departments, according to the Department of Justice. Each has its own rules, responsibilities, and powers, including the processes by which they discipline their officers and record data on their employees. Most don’t collect the same kinds of information, making the process of crunching police conduct data into one uniform database difficult and time-consuming, says Maira Kwaja, director of public strategy at the Invisible Institute.“What we’ve learned in just doing this in Chicago, that the way that the city government maintains and creates data changes from almost year to year. Every few years they move to a different database…. Even being sure that an officer is the same person from year to year is very tough,” said Kwaja. If an officer moves departments, tracking their conduct can become nearly impossible.“There’s no unique identifier for each individual officer in the country, so if an officer gets fired or resigns, they can easily move to another jurisdiction and start working, and there’s no real way to track that throughout the country,” said Kwaja.All data is taken from the source: http://usatoday.comArticle Link: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2…#police #newsamerican#newstodayupdate #newstodaydonaldtrump #newstodayheadlines #newsworldbbc #

Categories
Police Reform

Milwaukee police reform, mental health response discussed | FOX6 News Milwaukee [Video]

Officials say Milwaukee police officers respond to roughly 200,000 calls for service per year – thousands of those related to mental health. https://bit.ly/3rHzdLrSubscribe to FOX6 News Milwaukee: https://www.youtube.com/user/fox6now?sub_confirmation=1Watch FOX6 News Milwaukee Live: https://www.fox6now.com/liveFOX6 News Milwaukee delivers breaking news, live events, investigations, politics, entertainment, business news and local stories from southeast Wisconsin and across the nation.Watch more FOX6 News Milwaukee on YouTube:COVID-19 vaccine: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfav6qexj8qdvDr03TmgnkZ8V9evxg3fzContact 6: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfav6qexj8qd43CQIoFGQLmFdOQpXIB5RFOX6 Investigators: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfav6qexj8qc45gWA1j4GSqh139c4plk1Beyond the Game: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfav6qexj8qeeBkhFkNtA7NS05eMrlf4tFOX6 WakeUp News: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfav6qexj8qc6h0i9H9ANuBDR6GE-MikRDownload the FOX6 News Milwaukee app: https://fox6news.onelink.me/MVy8?pid=social&c=youtube&af_web_dp=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fox6now.com%2FappsDownload the FOX6 Storm Center app: https://www.fox6now.com/appsFollow FOX6 News Milwaukee on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fox6news/Follow FOX6 News Milwaukee on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fox6now/Follow FOX6 News Milwaukee on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fox6now/Subscribe to the FOX6 News Milwaukee newsletter: https://www.fox6now.com/email

Categories
Police Reform

Bass Downplays Role Of Qualified Immunity In Stalled Police Reform Bill [Video]

Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., a lead negotiator trying to forge an agreement over a policing bill, downplayed the role that the controversial issue of qualified immunity has played in stalled bipartisan talks. Qualified immunity protects police and government officials from being held personally liable for civil violations committed while on the job. It is also one of progressives’ major priorities on police accountability. Speaking to All Things Considered’s Ailsa Chang on Thursday, Bass said there had been discussions of allowing for police departments to be sued rather than individual police officers, but that the subject had not dominated the bipartisan negotiations.”It is a compromise that has been discussed,” Bass said. “I will tell you that qualified immunity still remains up in the air. But contrary to the press coverage, we have spent very little time talking about qualified immunity.”The bulk of our time have been talking about the other 18 to 19 aspects of the bill because frankly, if we could reach agreement on the majority of those, we would still have a substantial piece of legislation. Then we can look back at qualified immunity.”Another lead negotiator — South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, the lone Black Republican in the chamber — said on Fox News Sunday recently that allowing civil lawsuits against individual officers is “dead stop, not going to happen.”Bass’ interview comes as the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act has been languishing in the Senate. She and the two other negotiators, Scott and Sen. Cory Booker, D-N. J., announced a month ago that they had “reached an agreement on a framework,” but there’s been no apparent progress since. The House passed the bill in March.”The hurdle is the Senate,” Bass said. “And, you know, it’s the hurdle with every single piece of legislation because of the filibuster, you have to get 60 votes. And so that puts Tim Scott in the catbird seat.” She noted he’s up for reelection in 2022.All data is taken from the source: http://npr.orgArticle Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/07/29/1022513671/bass-downplays-role-of-qualified-immunity-in-stalled-police-reform-bill#immunity #newsyearsday #newsworldnow #newsworldtoday #usanewstoday #newstodayheadlines #